Volunteers Do Their Best Work While Engaged

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No, not engaged to be married. But engaged with their work on a higher level.


Truth be told, unskilled and highly skilled volunteers are having a difficult time finding volunteer opportunities that are both challenging, engaging, and keeps them coming back for more. Despite the best effort of a few nonprofits who are doing their best to find and engage with top tier talent.


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There are plenty areas that people have a unique set of skills in that the nonprofit sector does not historically have in-house. Whether that’s web design, graphic design, translation services, cooking, animal training, plumbing, knitting and so other skills that are necessary (or a luxury) for a nonprofit to be successful.


The great part about people who have these skills is they’re almost always interested, motivated, and engaged with their work. It just so happens it’s these three attributes that comprise the perfect volunteer. Interested, motivated, and engaged.


But how do nonprofits not only find these volunteers, but keep all their interests, skills, and passions organized? How are they able to keep them organized and easily reach out to them when their eclectic skills are needed?


Here are a few ways nonprofits are able to keep their highly skilled volunteers engaged, and available on demand.


How does your nonprofit keep its highly skilled volunteers engaged? Let us know in the comment section below.

  1. Define exactly what you need

    You cant find or keep something (or in this case, someone) unless you know exactly what you that person for. If when asked about the skill you need to see in a volunteer you reply: “digital stuff” chances are, you’re not exactly sure what you need that person to perform.


    Try making a list that has the skills you need a volunteer to have, while being as specific as possible. Don’t write ‘web design’ for example. Instead, write ‘We need someone to design a new masthead for our webpage.


  2. Volunteer management CRM

    A lot of nonprofits are harnessing the power of CRMs, like VolunteerConnect, to manage their volunteer relationships. Nonprofits are making it easier on themselves to track and manage their relationships with software specially designed to assist nonprofits in doing so. Being able save what special skills a volunteers has, and likes to donate to your nonprofit makes it easy to quickly contact the right person for the job.



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  4. Engage volunteers

    Don’t just expect your volunteers to just stand on the assembly line and make their widgets, especially those with ‘high skills.’ Engage your volunteers and have them help you identify larger issues your nonprofit might be facing, and what possible solutions to those problems might be.


    Their third party point of view might just surprise you.


Topics: data, npTech, constituent relationship management system, General, Leadership, CRM, nonprofits, technology, database, nonprofit technology, volunteers, nonprofit

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